How to Travel More in 2019

People often "live vicariously" through others' Instagram, Facebook, or Pinterest feeds, envying their adventures yet they never go anywhere themselves. Why not? It’s not because they don’t want to travel, rather, it’s because they aren’t making travel a priority in their life. This is not to say that there aren’t real challenges that coexist alongside travel (family, professional, financial challenges), but it’s important to recognize that no goal can be achieved until it’s made a priority. Here are some suggestions to start working on that bucket list:

Tobacco fields in Cuba

Tobacco fields in Cuba

Desert oasis in Huacachina, Peru

Desert oasis in Huacachina, Peru

Hiking in Iceland

Hiking in Iceland

  1. Acknowledge that travel is important to you

Unfortunately, many people consider travel a luxury, an unnecessary expense that falls behind other expenses. For me, travel is crucial to both my happiness and creativity. Life is hectic, especially in New York City, and when I travel, I reset my brain and come back rested, calm, and with more perspective and bandwidth to take on the world. Considering the insight or inspiration travel can add to your life may help you rationalize spending time and money on it. Rather than a luxury, you may decide travel is necessary and important for your lifestyle.

Why Traveling is Important

  • Traveling helps you discover more about yourself

  • It teaches you how to handle unexpected and difficult situations (especially as a solo traveler!)

  • It expands your appreciation for other people and cultures

  • It helps you learn languages and teaches you to communicate with people around the world

  • Navigating new territories and risks taking build self-confidence

  • Breaking out of your comfort zone abroad emboldens you to take risks at home

  • Comparing your good fortune to the humble lives of others makes you more compassionate

  • You earn bragging rights to say “I’ve been there,” while watching Anthony Bourdain on TV

  • You create memories more valuable than anything you could ever buy

Crossing the last Inca reed bridge in Peru

Crossing the last Inca reed bridge in Peru

The camel that would throw me into the Sahara Desert

The camel that would throw me into the Sahara Desert

Day of the Dead in Mexico

Day of the Dead in Mexico

2. Develop Your Bucket list

Write down your bucket list of places you want to visit in your life then think about when you want to go, who you want to go with, and what you want to do there. Perhaps you've always dreamed of spending a week on the beach and snorkeling in Playa del Carmen, Mexico. Or perhaps you want to take your mother to see the Northern Lights in Iceland, hike Machu Picchu with your boyfriend, or visit the pyramids in Egypt with your sister. By writing down your travel goals, you can better visualize them and figure out how and where to work them into your life THIS YEAR.

3. Work it in Financially

Whether you're saving for occasional trips or consider travel a yearly expense, you need to know what you're able to spend each escape. Budgeting for trips helps you plan ahead and then enjoy the trip rather than feeling stressed or guilty about money during the vacation. Here are a few tips for funneling extra money into your travel budget:

  • Arrange for a pre-set amount of money to come out of each paycheck and go into a dedicated travel savings account

  • Request donations to a travel fund in lieu of traditional birthday/holiday/wedding presents

  • Cut back on unnecessary expenses like eating out, a daily Starbucks fix, and cable TV

  • Use a rewards credit card for all purchases to rack up airline miles that can be used to book free flights (just be sure to pay off the balance each month)

  • Earmark your tax refund check for a trip

Find more financing tips in my post about How to Budget for Your Vacation.

Scuba diving in Playa del Carmen, Mexico

Scuba diving in Playa del Carmen, Mexico

Bikepacking Bermuda

Bikepacking Bermuda

Machu Pichu, Peru

Machu Pichu, Peru

4. Use Your Vacation Time

This may seem like a no-brainier but according to the US Travel Association, more than half (54%) of employees left vacation time unused last year. A former boss once announced in a team meeting that I was the only employee who used all my vacation time. At another job, a friend lost two weeks of vacation when it expired. You probably aren't being paid enough to begin with so stop being a work martyr and take advantage of what you're entitled to!

5. Get Around the 9-5

How do you travel more if you work full-time? Up until recently, I worked a fairly traditional 9-5 at a non-profit focusing on increasing access to healthy foods in undeserved communities. I received the standard two-weeks of vacation but traveled far more frequently. When I was teaching nutrition in public schools, I still managed to visit Egypt & Jordan over winter break; escape to Bermuda for a 4-day weekend over Memorial Day; and lead TWO group trips to Cuba during the February and April school breaks.

Granted, not everyone's boss is as agreeable and not everyone's job is as flexible but in every position I've ever had, I've worked in more travel than my coworkers because I prioritized it and worked it out with my boss and co-workers. Now it's your turn.

Bank overtime and use “comp” hours

One method is banking overtime or "comp" hours and then redeeming them for 4-day weekends. I also tacked comp time onto official vacations and holidays to allow me to get away 2-3 weeks at a time, even if it meant having to work overtime when I returned.

Turn work travel into a personal vacation

I also sought out professional development opportunities in my field that allowed me to travel. In some cases, I was awarded scholarships and grants that covered some travel costs. When my job would grant time off but didn't have a travel budget, I would Couchsurf to keep costs low. In just two years, I attended conferences in Detroit, Los Angeles, Chicago and New Orleans. Conferences are typically three days so I could use two days of comp/overtime and enjoy the weekends on both sides of a trip, turning a 3-day work trip into a 9-day adventure.

Take unpaid time off

Even if you don’t have much proper vacation time at your job, many companies are open to granting unpaid time off. I’ve been able to negotiate this in several jobs and the additional adventures I took were well worth the missed paycheck.

Camping in the salt flats of Baja California

Camping in the salt flats of Baja California

Whale watching road trip through Mexico

Whale watching road trip through Mexico

6. take advantage of Flexible & Last Minute Travel

As a new entrepreneur, I'm thrilled to be able to have more control of my schedule and be able to do a lot of my work from anywhere in the world that has a wifi connection. This has allowed me to take advantage of last minute travel deals or error fares (I love Scott's Cheap Flights for this). Even when I had a "regular" job, my co-workers and I would sometimes need to use up our vacation time before it ran out or would have a light week that didn't require being in the office every day . This was the perfect opportunity to check out cheap last minute flights or travel deals.

If flying isn't an option, consider where trains and buses can get you for a long-weekend. Perhaps you could stay with friends or family you haven't seen for a while or you could book a quiet cabin in the woods if you need to be alone. Perhaps you can only spare one day, no worries, you can still escape to the closest bit of nature near you, be it the beach, hiking trail, mountain, or national park. Spending the day looking at clouds, water, and trees can bring many of the same benefits of a full vacation.

Being flexible can also make it easier to sneak in travel. Had your heart set on a spring trip to Mexico then realized your approved vacation time falls during busy spring break when prices are inflated? Consider visiting a less-popular but equally beautiful destination like Guatemala or using the time to explore a driveable/busable option and postponing the Mexico trip to later in the year. Is Tokyo too expensive? Consider Thailand! My best friend and global solo traveler extraordinaire, Judi, desperately needed a break from the cold winter in NYC and just booked a 10-day trip to Guadalupe in the Southern Caribbean. Why? Because it was the cheapest warm destination during the busy holiday travel season. Better yet, the island's lower profile means it won't be as crammed with tourists as neighboring islands.

7. save money on accommodations

Couchsurfing

No, couch surfing isn’t as scary as you think. I’ve done it in dozens of countries and have had largely positive experiences and made lifelong friends. Of course it’s nice to save money by staying with someone for free (I’ve often had my own room and sometimes had the entire apartment to myself), the real advantage of Couchsurfing is that you get to meet and stay with locals, who offer an authentic insight into their city.

AirBnB

AirBnB is often cheaper than hotels, you can get a full kitchen (which helps cut down on restaurant expenses), and hosts often provide tips on fun, cheap thigns to do. Use my promo code to save $40 on AirBnB.

House Sitting

TrustedHousesitters is another great site where you can care for someone’s home and animals while they’re away traveling. Of course there’s some work involved in caring for homes and animals but you get a free place to stay! Use code RAF139362 to get 25% off membership!

Cheap Hotels

Some favorite discount booking sites (along with a new sign-up bonus code!) are Booking.com, HotelsCombined.com, and Hostelworld, which lists affordable hostels and hotels in 170 countries that are especially popular with millennials and budget travelers.

Greeting llamas in Cusco

Greeting llamas in Cusco

Petra, Jordan, one of the 7 wonders of the world

Petra, Jordan, one of the 7 wonders of the world

Snorkeling with my niece & nephew in Mexico

Snorkeling with my niece & nephew in Mexico

8. save money at your destination

Once you get to your destination, here's a few quick tips for stretching your dollar:

  • Find restaurant, hotel, sightseeing, and event deals on Groupon.

  • Search Meetup.com for free and cheap events based on your interests (sports, movies, culture).

  • Buy ingredients at the supermarket and cook your own food or have a picnic!

  • Opt for inexpensive street food instead of dining in expensive restaurants.

  • Use public transportation or rent bicycles instead of paying for taxis.

    • Ride shares are a cheaper, safer option than taxis in many countries. Uber is available all over the world. New users discount with my Uber promo code.

9. avoid common excuses

Whether it’s kids, pets, a car, or a looming mortgage, we’ve all come up with excuses to put off our goals. There's so many options so stop making excuses and start asking around!

What to do with pets while traveling

Pets are great but they're no excuse not to travel. If you don't have friends or relatives to care for your animals, hire a pet sitter! Some will come to your home to check in on your furry friends and others will care for your animals at their home so they get round-the-clock attention. TrustedHousesitters helps you find verified pet sitters to stay at your place and care for your animals FOR FREE. Use code RAF139362 to get 25% off membership!

How to cover rent and mortgage while traveling

Is a hefty mortgage/rent payment burdening you? Great! Sublet your place and put the money toward travel. This is particularly true in large cities where the $1000-2000 you pay per month on living expenses is more than enough to live off of in at least half the countries around the world. Many of my long-haul flights were paid for by the money I got from subletters. Did I mention my AirBnB promo code can get you $75 for listing your space? Craigslist is also a great option to find short- and long-term renters. Worried about your stuff? Don't be. That's what references, renters' insurance, and the security deposit are for. Any particularly valuable items can be moved to storage or stashed with trusted friends/family.

What to do with your car while traveling

For those burdened (or blessed?) with a car but not fortunate enough to have a driveway, finding parking can be a hassle. Alternate side parking rules (like they have in NYC) provide an additional challenge when traveling. Again - not an excuse! I was happy to borrow a car from my previously mentioned friend, Jen, while she was traveling. I moved the car to avoid parking tickets on street cleaning days and treated myself to a Korean day spa that's hard to reach on public transit. When my boyfriend needed to stash his car when we traveled together, a center where I've taught fitness classes allowed him to park his car in their parking lot. Another friend offered her grandmother's driveway. Of course, there's always long-term parking at the airport, though it may be expensive.

Hot Air Balloon over the Valley of the Kings in Egypt

Hot Air Balloon over the Valley of the Kings in Egypt

Floating reed islands of Peru

Floating reed islands of Peru

Traveling with Kids

As an unmarried woman with no kids, I often hear "well, it must be easy to travel since you have no kids." You're right, it is! I traveled to Mexico with my three nieces and nephews (including an infant) so I absolutely understand kids make a trip more challenging. I am constantly inspired by families who travel, some who even consider themselves "nomadic parents" providing their children with a world-schooling experience. Travel is one of the best educations you can ever give your kids, so don’t use them as an excuse to stay home.  Even if taking your family across 13 countries in a camper van isn't your goal, shorter trips can also be fun and fulfilling.

My good friend Jen, a social worker and single mother in Brooklyn, has been taking her 12-year-old-son around the world with her since he was two. Their adventures have taken them from South Africa, Zimbabwe, and Botswana, to Trinidad, Puerto Rico and dozens of US cities and national parks. They enjoyed their recent two-week trip to Kenya so much that she is taking a 3-month break from work next summer to take him to explore Uganda before returning to Kenya to volunteer in an orphanage. That experience will surely beat out any summer camp Stateside!

Yes, it’s harder to travel with kids and the majority of people on the plane would rather you left the kids at home, but who cares about them? Your kids will thank you later and you'll be amazed at how travel can open their eyes, reset their priorities, teach them to value what they have, and finally get off their phone!

10. Turn off your phone

Did you know that being on your phone during your vacation actually takes away from your travel experience? It takes you out of the moment and shifts your focus to your regular daily routine and headaches. Over-documenting a trip can cause you to be more focused on the picture or video you're taking instead of enjoying the experience and creating full, vivid memories. Given that my travel business requires me to share constant updates about my whereabouts, I personally struggle with this principle. By turning off your phone, your vacation seems to last longer and actually feels like a vacation. I have spent several weeks abroad at a time yet spent so much time checking email and social media that I felt like I never left home. I've also enjoyed quick overnight nature escapes where I put my phone on airplane mode for 24-36 hours and felt like I had enjoyed a full vacation.

Don't get me wrong, I don't miss hunting for internet cafes or having to pre-print out maps, directions, and lists of attractions and restaurants and bring them with me around the world. Technology has made traveling SO MUCH EASIER and accessible. Check out a list of useful travel apps in my recent holiday travel tips post, but try to keep the phone usage to a minimum during the vacation.

what are your tips for traveling more?

What did I miss? What have been your strategies to work in more travel? Please leave your ideas in the comments below.